antoney:

ridexridexponyx:

if you dont like otters i dont like you

OHMYGOSH

(Source: catsbeaversandducks)

minxiekitten:

raubbenhood:

Disneyworld needs to make a rollercoaster based off of the ride Yzma and Kronk take to the lair. When the ride starts, Yzma’s voice yells “pull the lever, Kronk!” and the ride starts to move backwards so she yells “wrong lever!” and it shoots you forward.

WHY IS THIS NOT HAPPENING?!

moriarty:

dumbass

moriarty:

dumbass

needlekind:

if you get a group of at least five people between their late teens and early/middish twenties and have one of them quote spongebob squarepants i swear to god they can kill half an hour at minimum just quoting random and often unrelated spongebob snippets back and forth at each other nigh verbatim without any other conversation, this is basically science

super-mario-rpg:

roxenfel:

the nintendo ds came out 10 years ago

image

(Source: historyexam)

rneerkat:

“youre always on your computer” well ur always on my nerves

(Source: rneerkat)

bombing:

[tries to crowd surf at a TED talk]

wizardgrum:

strovi:

oh man i love fictional boys that are like, really greedy and rich and someties evil

image

In some ways, the term “pansexual” came out of biphobia and a need to stipulate that one was not transphobic. If you take the binary view of “bisexual,” then a sexuality specific to an attraction to men and women could be seen as being noninclusive of transgender men and women. On the other hand, transgender men and women want to (and should) be seen as simply men and women, meaning that they would/should be included in that very binary; not including them tends to be much more phobic and noninclusive.

Then there is the thought that the binary view of bisexuality can be seen as phobic of anyone who identifies as genderqueer, or somewhere along the gender and sexuality spectrum, not identifying as male or female, man or woman. But, as I mentioned before, the true definition of “bisexual” is being attracted to those who are the same as me and those who are different from me, encompassing all genders and identities. The often-repeated argument that “bi means two” ignores a simple fact: “Same” and “different” are, indeed, two groups.


All in the Golden Afternoon. 

All in the Golden Afternoon. 

(Source: disney-pixars)